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Conduit Bending Theory
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Porcupine Labor Press




 

 

Conduit Bending Theory

The different types of conduit bends, as well as the factors involved in accurately calculating bends are discussed in this section.

The pages for Offset Bends and Segment Bends each contain bending calculators.  The user can enter sample dimensions for the type of bend, and the calculator will give the desired measurements.  I will add other calculators as I develop them.

These calculators are tested on Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 and Netscape Navigator 4.05, and may not work with other browsers.

The Right Triangle and the Trigonometric Functions

There are several trigonometric functions that electricians need to know to be able to understand and make the calculations necessary for bending conduit.

Figure 1 is a drawing of a typical right triangle used to give a graphic display of the trigonometric functions used to calculate the angles and lengths used to fabricate conduit bends. 

represents the angle used to bend a piece of conduit, or the angle to be calculated if the lengths of two of the sides are known. 

The Hypotenuse is the side opposite the right angle of the triangle. 

The Opposite side is the side opposite the angle .  

The Adjacent side is the side adjacent to the angle .

Figure 1 shows the 6 trigonometric functions commonly used by electricians.  Trigonometric functions are used to calculate the relationships of the sides and angles of a right triangle. 

TrigFunc.wmf (7516 bytes) The Sine, or Sin of the angle is the length of the side Opposite the angle divided by the length of the Hypotenuse.

The Cosine, or Cos of the angle is the length of the side Adjacent to the angle divided by the length of the Hypotenuse.

The Tangent, of Tan of the angle is the length of the side Opposite the angle divided by the length of the side Adjacent to the angle .

The Cotangent, or Cot of the angle is the length of the side of the triangle Adjacent to the angle divided by the length of the side Opposite the angle .

The Secant, or Sec of the angle is the length of the Hypotenuse of the triangle divided by the length of the side Adjacent to the angle .

The Cosecant, or Csc of the angle is the length of the Hypotenuse of the triangle divided by the length of the side Opposite the angle .

These functions will be used in several formulas to explain the theory of conduit bending.

Follow the links below for information about the different types of conduit bends and how these functions and triangle are used.

Conduit Bending

   
Conduit Bending Theory
       
Stub Up, or 90 Bends
       
Back To Back Bends
       
Offset Bends
       
3-Bend Saddles
       
Parallel Bends
       
Segment Bends
       
Concentric Bends


   
Charts And Tables
       
Greenlee Benders
       
Trig Tables
       
Fractional Equivalents

 
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Copyright 1998-2012 Dennis Lackey -- All Rights Reserved

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